Less sleep, daily burnout increases your chances of getting COVID-19 – New study

  • A research published in BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health revealed how lack of good sleep and burnout increases your chances of getting COVID-19
  • According to the study, for every hour of extra sleep we get, we lower the chances of getting infected with COVID-19 by 12%
  • Those who suffer with sleep problems and daily burnout have an 88% greater chance of being infected with Covid-19

A new study revealed that there is a link between sleep problems and burnout to higher chances of COVID-19.

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A research published in BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health showed that well rested healthcare workers are at a lower risk for COVID-19 compared to those who have less sleep.

According to the study, healthcare workers who reported sleep problems in the year before the pandemic had 88% greater odds of contracting COVID-19 than those who slept well.

Other sleep problems such as disrupted sleep, insomnia and daily burnout contribute to a higher risk for the infection and are even linked to more severe Covid-19 symptoms and longer recovery periods.

Based on the observational study, it found out that for every hour of extra sleep we get, we lower the chances of getting infected with COVID-19 by 12%. However, the researchers noted that sleep should be done at nighttime because daytime napping didn’t have any protective effects against Covid-19.

In fact, an extra hour of daytime sleep was even associated with 6% higher chances of infection, although this association varied by country.

“This study spotlights an often neglected area of wellbeing: the need for quality sleep and re-charge time to prevent burnout and its consequences,” Minha Rajput-Ray, Medical Director of NNEdPro Global Centre for Nutrition & Health, said in a statement.

Those who also suffer from daily burnout were more than twice as likely to become infected with the coronavirus and roughly three times as likely to experience severe infections.

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The study is highly significant especially for healthcare workers who are often overworked. Researchers surveyed 2,884 healthcare workers with heavy coronavirus exposure in Europe, the UK, and the United States.